Subsidiarity in Global Governance: Symposium Issue out!

Today our symposium issue on ‘Subsidiarity in Global Governance’ has been published in Law & Contemporary Problems – the fruit of a project that started more than four years ago and revisited the theme through two workshops at the Hertie School of Governance in Berlin and various iterations of papers, drafts and revisions. The result is a wide-ranging symposium with l&cp logotwelve articles that inquire into the potential and limits of subsidiarity in the global context from different theoretical angles and for different issue areas, such as human rights, international security, trade, investment, and labour regulation. The general idea is laid out in the framing paper by Markus Jachtenfuchs and myself; the other contributions come from a stellar cast that includes Andreas von Staden, Tomer Broude, Isabel Feichtner, René Urueña, Jorge Contesse, Andreas Føllesdal, Machiko Kanetake, Isobel Roele, Peer Zumbansen, Mattias Kumm, Kalypso Nicolaidis and Rob Howse. The symposium is fully open-access and can be found here – please have a look!

Subsidiarity in Global Governance at ICONS Conference

ICON-S-logoAs part of the ICONS conference in Berlin, we’ll have a panel on ‘Subsidiarity on Global Governance’ in which we aim to discuss findings of our recent research project on the topic. We’ll have papers on the general theme (by Markus Jachtenfuchs and myself), on selective subsidiarity in the WTO (by Tomer Broude), on subsidiarity as a guiding principle in international human rights courts (by Andreas Follesdal) and on side-lining subsidiarity in collective security (by Isobel Roele). The papers are part of a broader symposium on the topic that will appear in Law & Contemporary Problems later in the summer. The panel, moderated by Grainne de Burca, will juxtapose different takes on subsidiarity and try to work out whether and to what extent the principle should serve as guidance for allocating powers in global governance. It will take place on Friday, 17 June, from 17:15 to 19:00 at Humboldt University in room BE2 E42. The overall conference programme is here – with lots of exciting talks and panels!

Russian Approaches to IL: Roundtable 13 April

KremlinOn 13 April the Graduate Institute will host a round table on ‘Russian Approaches to International Law’, which will discuss the recent book on the topic by Lauri Malksoo (University of Tartu). The event is co-organized with the Law Faculty of the University of Geneva. Participants will be, apart from the author, Laurence Boisson de Chazournes (University of Geneva), Olga Chernishova (European Court of Human Rights), Maria Issaeva (Threefold Legal Advisors LLC, Moscow), Fuad Zarbiyev (Graduate Institute) and myself. The discussion will start at 17:30. Details are here – all welcome, but please register on the site.

 

 

Accountability in Global Governance: Europe’s Roles

Globe 2016 springToday I have a short piece out in the review of the Graduate Institute, the Globe, on ‘Accountability in Global Governance: Europe as Laboratory, Vanguard, or Obstacle?‘. In this piece I trace different ways in which the European Union – through its judicial as well as political bodies – contributes to the construction of a global administrative law, but also acts in certain areas as an important obstacle to it. The text forms part of a broader symposium on Europe in the World which contains a number of interesting contributions from different disciplinary angles. The whole issue is available here.

Transnational Sovereignties: London, 17-18 March

Transnational SovereigntiesNext week I’ll participate in an exciting conference on ‘Transnational Sovereignties: Constellations, Processes, Contestations’, convened by Peer Zumbansen and Stephen Minas at King’s College London, and bringing together a great group of scholars with very different perspectives. I’ll talk about ‘Liquid Sovereignty?’, drawing on my work on liquid authority as well as my broader engagement with translating political ideas from the domestic to the international level. Information on the conference, also on how to attend, can be found here.

International Law Literature Forum

LitForum pictureThe International Law Literature Forum at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva is a new platform to discuss contemporary cutting-edge international law scholarship. It focuses on work in progress and seeks to stimulate an open discussion of new directions in scholarship in the Geneva research community. In the spring of 2016, it features an exciting programme with papers by Mikael Rask Madsen (University of Copenhagen, 29 Feb), Yuval Shany (Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 16 March), Jan Kleinheisterkamp (London School of Economics, 7 April), Ignacio de la Rasilla del Moral (Brunel University, 27 April), Ratna Kapur (Jindal Global Law School, 11 May) and Georg Nolte (Humboldt University, Berlin, 30 May). Information on the different sessions and topics can be found on the Forum website.

Workshop on Adaptation and Change in Global Governance – Barcelona, Feb 2016

BCNWGGBarcelona Workshop on Global Governance: “Adaptation and Change in Global Governance”, 4 & 5 February 2016  

Next week IBEI and ESADE will host an exciting workshop on adaptation and change in global governance – the 4th edition of the Barcelona Workshop on Global Governance – which I’m co-organizing. There is a great lineup of speakers, with keynotes being given by David Held, Pascal Lamy and Javier Solana. The programme is here, the idea below. The workshop is open, but registration is required here.

Adaptation and Change in Global Governance

The world is changing, but its institutions do not always change in the same way and at the same speed. Global governance institutions adapt and change in response to both internal and external stimuli, and they often also provoke changes in norms, structures and other actors. Much of the infrastructure of global governance—including intergovernmental organizations, international normative frameworks, and privately-created bodies—was created in the aftermath of World War II. In many cases, the mandates of intergovernmental organizations and private bodies have since expanded beyond recognition, budgets and staff numbers have multiplied, and legal frameworks have been extended and revised. In short, the world looks very different now from 70 years ago, and so too do the institutions of global governance. Still, many observers decry a reluctance to change, even a gridlock. Against this background, the 2016 Barcelona Workshop on Global Governance asks how the institutions of global governance change – how they initiate and manage internal reforms, adapt in response to external stimuli, and provoke change in other institutions – and what limitations this change faces. Key questions include:

  • How do institutions adapt in response to external changes? Are some kinds of institution more adaptable than others? What determines their level of adaptability?
  • What are the main drivers of internal change in international organizations? How is such change resisted, accepted, and managed?
  • What role does individual leadership play in guiding change in global governance institutions?
  • How do global governance institutions provoke change in international norms, structures, and other actors?

The Barcelona Workshop on Global Governance is a venue for the study of global governance – its structure, effects, and problems – from an interdisciplinary perspective, bringing together scholars from international relations, law, sociology, anthropology, political theory, public administration and history. Its 4th edition will be held on 4 & 5 February 2016 in Barcelona. The workshop is organized by ESADEgeo (ESADE Business School’s Center for Global Economy and Geopolitics) and IBEI (Institut Barcelona d’Estudis Internacionals). The Organizing Committee consists of Miriam Bradley, IBEI; Nico Krisch, IBEI & Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies; Angel Saz‐Carranza, ESADEgeo